Oceanology International: 15th – 17th March 2016 ExCeL London United Kingdom

Oceanology International in London, UK, is the leading exhibition on marine science and ocean technology.

SMP LTD will be exhibiting at Oceanology 2016, where samples of our products will be on display. Our representatives and technical experts will be available to talk to you about our subsea solutions and our range of products that are manufactured in the UK and used internationally.

Visit our stand R161 to find out about our range of commercial diving, subsea, hyperbaric and tunnelling solutions.

We are looking forward to meeting with both existing and potential new customers. Please let us know in advance if you would like to schedule a meeting with us at the event.

To find out more about Oceanology and to register for tickets, please visit the official Oceanology website:
www.oceanologyinternational.com

Transfer Under Pressure (TUP) Diving System

We are offering for sale a Transfer Under Pressure (TUP) Diving System.
The TUP Diving System is a Closed Bell Diving System, designed and manufactured by SMP Ltd.

It is certified in accordance with International Maritime Contractors Association (IMCA) guidelines and codes of practice for offshore diving operations and certified by Lloyds Register of Shipping.


This compact modular system consists of a 3 man 4.7m3 saturation diving bell, diver’s gas control panels (air/mixed gas), main Bell/Diver control panel, twin lock decompression chamber, single lock decompression chamber (optional), HP and LP compressors, gantry launch and recovery system.

The system is equipped for air diving and mixed gas diving and the clump weight also incorporates a tool basket for the divers. A hyperbaric floataway chamber is optional.

The Diving System is a mobile and modular system that can be mobilised on a DPII support vessel, platform, rig or construction barge. The system is designed for moonpool or over the side operations. Using Trimix or Nitrox gas mixtures will allow longer duration in-water bottom time at greater depths than using air diving techniques which cause longer in-water and decompression practices.

By providing a closed bell system the divers are transferred in a protected environment. Safety is increased by removing the threat of Nitrogen intoxication. This is achieved by making sure at no point is the diver exposed to atmospheric pressure during decompression.

The benefits are clear to see and it is the way forward in today’s demanding market for deep air diving operations and continual surface mixed gas operations.

Safe No surface decompression interval, protected transfer to and from the splashzone
Proven An enhanced proven solution that increases workable bottom time
Future Proof Upgradeable to Saturation Diving Capability (Future Proof Capability)
Cost Effective The system provides cost effectiveness through increased bottom times for the divers
Mobile This modular system can be easily transported and mobilised in 24 hours providing fast turnaround for offshore operations on any suitable vessel

There is also the capability for one dive team to be in decompression whilst a second dive team commence diving operations which means less down time on jobs.

Download our Full Product Brochure for all specifications and features

Contact us sales@smp-ltd.co.uk with any questions or if you are interested in a quotation.

Ask our Team
SMP design, manufacture and supply a wide range of commercial diving equipment, please email sales@smp-ltd.co.uk or telephone +44 (0)1772 687775 for a quotation on all your commercial diving needs from branded products to bespoke manufactured items all at competitive prices.

SMP Apprentice meets British Prime Minister David Cameron

Matthew Thompson (far right) with Mark Menzies and David Cameron

Matthew Thompson, an Electrical Engineering Apprentice at Submarine Manufacturing and Products (SMP Ltd) last week met with British Prime Minister, David Cameron and Fylde MP, Mark Menzies at BAE Systems in Warton, Lancashire.

The Prime Minister was visiting the North of England to highlight the importance of apprenticeships as a career-choice and as a means of sustaining and developing the UK skills base. While in Warton, David Cameron and Mark Menzies launched a new £15.6m Lancashire training academy for Degree Apprenticeship schemes.

Mr Cameron stated “I want young people to have the chance to learn a skill and that is why the government has put 1.5bn pounds extra into the apprentices system and we want to see that grow.”

David Cameron talking to apprentices including Matthew Thompson.

More than 300 apprentices from companies across the North West were in attendance. One of our apprentices, Matthew Thompson (pictured with Mr Cameron and Mr Menzies) had the opportunity to individually discuss his apprenticeship with Mr Cameron and leading executives from BAE Systems.

SMP Ltd is currently training 5 apprentices at its premises in Newton, near Preston.

Briggs Marine Contractors to Start Kames-Bute Subsea Cable Repair

Briggs Marine Contractors Limited has advised mariners that it will be undertaking submarine power cable repair works between Kames and Bute.

Marine operations will be running from Tuesday, February 17, 2015 to Friday, February 27, 2015.

According to Briggs, operations will be carried out from the vessels Forth Guardsman and Forth Jouster. Forth Guardsman will perform cable repair operations using a 4 point mooring pattern offshore. Forth Guardsman will be supported by Forth Jouster as Anchor Handling Tug / Dive Support Vessel Vessel.

During cable repair operations, Forth Guardsman will be restricted in the ability to manoeuvre.

It is requested that all vessels operating within this area maintain a safe distance and pass at minimum speed.

During operations, the vessels will display the appropriate day shapes/signals and at times of reduced visibility the appropriate lights as required by the IRPCS. The vessels will also actively transmit an AIS signal. A continuous listening watch will be maintained on VHF Channel 16 and DSC.

Royal Navy and Norwegian Navy Joint Dive

Royal Navy divers took the opportunity to dive with their counterparts in the Norwegian Navy in Plymouth Sound.

The dive team from Southern Diving Unit 1, based in HM Naval Base, Devonport, Plymouth, joined colleagues from HnoMS Fridtjof Nansen, an advanced Royal Norwegian Navy frigate.

Lieutenant Commander Peter Davis, the Officer-in-Charge of the Royal Navy unit, said: “A crisp, cold day in Plymouth Sound was the perfect opportunity for the two navies to share their knowledge and the unique camaraderie created by working in the underwater environment.

“We are always happy to engage with visiting navies and cross-pollinate ideas and working practices.’’

Both teams took full advantage of the rare chance to dive with each other and share best practice.

The home unit is a Royal Naval clearance diving unit which is on 24-hour duty to dispose of ordnance through the South West and South Wales which poses a hazard to the public.

Three Norwegian divers embarked in a Royal Navy diving unit rigid inflatable boat to conduct a dive near Drake’s Island in Plymouth Sound.

Joined by two Royal Navy clearance divers, the Norwegian Navy divers conducted a set of emergency drills and a sea-bed survey to refine their skills and operational capability.

HnoMS Fridtof Nansen is conducting a rigorous training package with Devonport-based Flag Officer Sea Training staff to improve joint working ability with the Royal Navy.

The chance to dive together came after the Norwegians requested assistance with completing an equipment check during their busy programme and benefited their training.

James Fisher Defence acquires National Hyperbaric Centre

James Fisher and Sons plc recently announced the acquisition of the National Hyperbaric Centre Limited. NHC will become a division of JFD, which was formed by the merger of James Fisher Defence and Divex in 2014.

Whilst continuing to operate as a stand-alone business, NHC maintains its commitment to all existing and future customers who will benefit from an expanded support network, extensive global presence and greater financial stability.

NHC has a strong and established brand in the safe delivery of hyperbaric testing, medical decompression, training and consulting services. The acquisition will provide NHC with enhanced opportunities for future growth across all existing business streams, upholding and securing its identity as the Centre of Excellence for Subsea Safety.

David Smith, former owner and Managing Director, has stepped down and is supporting the transition process, as new General Manager, Alan Green, joins the team in Aberdeen. All other employees have remained with the business.

Saturation Dive Record: China Sets Depth of 330.2 Metres

A monitor shows a diver with the Chinese navy walks out of a 19-cubic-meter cylinder to perform a saturation dive effort, a technique involving a pressurized environment that allows for longer dives while reducing the risk of decompression sickness. [Photo: Chinanews.com]

Saturation Dive Record

Saturation Dive Record

Four divers with the Chinese navy have reached a depth of over 330 meters during a saturation dive effort, a technique involving a pressurized environment that allows for longer dives while reducing the risk of decompression sickness.

The four entered a 19-cubic-meter cylinder on January 4th and pressure was slowly increased to the equivalent of a depth of 300 meters.

Gao Jie, one of the divers, describes the experience in the deep sea.

“We thought 300-meter-deep seabed would be nothing but darkness, but when we opened the chamber, we found the visibility was good.”

Xu Xiao is the first diver to exit the chamber at a depth of 300 meters to check the diving bell and the environment.

“I felt like it was very cold and it was hard to breathe.”

Saturation diving technology enables human beings to withstand high water pressure by saturating human tissue with inert gas.

The divers were released from the cylinder yesterday after the decompression process was finally completed.

To date, eight countries, including Britain, the United States, and Russia have succeeded in 400-meter saturation dive.

Saturation diving is commonly used in deep sea exploration, in rescue operations and in engineering construction.

Chinese divers successfully reached 300 meters during a saturation dive for the first time last year, though have only experienced conditions over 490 meters during lab experiments.

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Here at SMP we manufacture Saturation Diving Systems in the UK. For speciifcation and pricing of our systems please contact us on +44(0)1772 687775 or email sales@smp-ltd.co.uk

IMCA Publishes Safety Rep Handbook

The International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA) has published a new tool for the industry – the ‘Safety Committee Representative’s Handbook’ (IMCA SEL 035), for use by safety committees on board vessels undertaking marine operations, recognised by IMCA as an excellent way of promoting and managing safety issues.

The handy wire bound A5 handbook is international in scope, and is written in straightforward and simple language. As well as providing guidance and information on a range of safety related topics it also covers the ‘nuts and bolts’ of how a safety committee works including:

• The function, remit and structure of safety committees
• How they affect welfare and the working environment
• Where safety representatives can find further information.

There is a chapter on some of the fundamental safety processes that are of importance to offshore personnel including risk assessment, safe systems of work, control of hazardous substances, manual handling, working at height and lifting operations.

It is now available for downloading free of charge for members and non-members alike at www.imca-int.com, and printed copies are available at £10 for members and £20 for non-members from publications@imca-int.com

Dickenson Ship Wreck discovered in in 2,000 feet of water

Researchers from the University of Hawaii and the NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries discovered an intact “ghost ship” in 2,000 feet of water nearly 20 miles off the coast of Oʻahu.

Sitting upright, its solitary mast still standing and the ship’s wheel still in place, the hulk of the former cable ship Dickenson, later the USS Kailua, was found on the seabed last year on a maritime heritage submersible mission.

On the mission were the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory’s (HURL) Terry Kerby, and James Delgado and Hans Van Tilburg of the maritime heritage program in NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.

Dickenson’s history
Launched in Chester, Pennsylvania, in early 1923 for the Commercial Pacific Cable Co., Dickenson was a vital part of a global network of submarine cable that carried telecommunications around the world. Dickenson arrived in Hawaii and started work in July of that year. Repairing cable and carrying supplies, Dickenson served the remote stations at Midway and Fanning Island from 1923 until 1941.

Dickenson was also chartered by Cable and Wireless Ltd., the British telecommunications company also operating in the Pacific, to evacuate company employees from Fanning Island. With Britain at war with Germany and its Axis partners, it was feared the station would be a target. Dickenson arrived at Pearl Harbor with the Fanning evacuees on the morning of December 7, 1941, sailing into a port at war. Some of the evacuees on Dickenson noticed a submarine following their ship, only to see it disappear as U.S. forces attacked the sub and drove it off.

Dickenson, later chartered by the U.S. Navy, entered service as USS Kailua (IX-71) to service cable and submarine nets in the South Pacific until it returned to Pearl Harbor at the end of the war. No longer needed by the Navy or the Commercial Cable Co., the former USS Kailua was sunk as a target by submarine torpedo fire on February 7, 1946. The exact location was not recorded, and the final resting place of the ship had remained a mystery.

“It is always a thrill when you are closing in on a large sonar target with the Pisces submersible and you don’t know what big piece of history is going to come looming out of the dark,” said Terry Kerby, HURL submersible pilot. “One of our first views of the USS Kailua was the classic helms wheel on the fantail. The ship was surprisingly intact for a vessel that was sunk with a torpedo. The upper deck structures from the bow to the stern were well-preserved and showed no sign of torpedo damage.”

“From her interisland service to her role in Pacific communications and then World War II, Dickenson today is like a museum exhibit resting in the darkness, reminding us of these specific elements of Pacific history,” said Hans Van Tilburg.

Press Release From: Subsea World News

James Ellison (British Superbike Rider) Hyperbaric Recovery

Check out this short video, where British Superbike rider James Ellison talks about his recovery and healing process from a horrific crash at Brands Hatch in 2014. After the accident the doctors advised him we would not be able to walk for 3 months, he was back competitively racing his bike within 6 weeks.

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James attributes part of his recovery to using a Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Chamber at Submarine Manufacturing and Products (SMP Ltd) facility just outside Preston. James states  “The main focus for me was just getting better, and the first step towards that is hyperbaric chamber treatment”

SMP Ltd design and manufacture a wide range of Hyperbaric Chambers and Oxygen Therapy equipment for use by divers, sports people and medical treatments. On the video Phil Connolly, managing director of SMP Ltd talks about the benefits of chambers like this for private medical institutions and sports injury clinics.

If you wish to learn more about our range of Hyperbaric Equipment and how they can benefit you or your business please get in touch with our sales team on +44 (0)1772 687775 / sales@smp-ltd.co.uk